The Supreme Court in a landmark judgment has allowed passive euthanasia, thereby giving succour to terminally ill patients and their relatives, but is India culturally ready for this move? Ramesh Menon reports. 

 

Chief Justice Misra remarked: “A patient in a terminally ill or persistent vegetative state exercising the right to refuse treatment may1 ardently wish to live but, at the same time, he may wish to be free from any medical surgery, drugs of treatment of any kind so as to avoid protracted physical suffering. Any such person who has come of age and is of sound mind has a right to refuse medical treatment.”

Chief Justice Misra remarked: “A patient in a terminally ill or persistent vegetative state exercising the right to refuse treatment may ardently wish to live but, at the same time, he may wish to be free from any medical surgery, drugs of treatment of any kind so as to avoid protracted physical suffering. Any such person who has come of age and is of sound mind has a right to refuse medical treatment.”

Chief Justice Misra remarked: “A patient in a terminally ill or persistent vegetative state exercising the right to refuse treatment may1 ardently wish to live but, at the same time, he may wish to be free from any medical surgery, drugs of treatment of any kind so as to avoid protracted physical suffering. Any such person who has come of age and is of sound mind has a right to refuse medical treatment.”